Share This Item:
    Biomechanics

Walking Really Is Just Falling and Catching Yourself - Inkfish | DiscoverMagazine.com

Interesting.

Comments

This is abundantly clear when watching early walkers(10 months to 18 months). It is seen again as they learn to run. Interestingly, we don't learn to walk through thinking about it but through observation and doing it. Practice is even performed... more »This is abundantly clear when watching early walkers(10 months to 18 months). It is seen again as they learn to run. Interestingly, we don't learn to walk through thinking about it but through observation and doing it. Practice is even performed during sleep - a form of toddler visualization for high performance. 10-03-2014 12:12pm

Comment by Carrie Sasynuik

When I think about it, yes it does make sense, especially as we learn to walk and run.  But as adults it's not as obvious.  Do you think it's all through observation or is it innate (CPG) just in our DNA to move? Other... more »When I think about it, yes it does make sense, especially as we learn to walk and run.  But as adults it's not as obvious.  Do you think it's all through observation or is it innate (CPG) just in our DNA to move? Other animals  stand and walk quickly after birth (within hours).  That can't be from observation....that has to be DNA and neural patterns (or the CPG) just telling it to move? 10-03-2014 1:13pm

I am sure DNA programs most living organisms with the ability to motate and to do so without having to waste too much time through observation. If the immature version cannot move within minutes to hours of birth the risk of death increases.... more »I am sure DNA programs most living organisms with the ability to motate and to do so without having to waste too much time through observation. If the immature version cannot move within minutes to hours of birth the risk of death increases. However, the article is talking of human perambulation mechanics and not quadrupeds. I agree with you that genetics has a very strong influence in young humans' drive to move (talk to any parent of a small child). But, do you not think that the environment can influence the genetic cascade in some instances when there is a lack of opportunity (e.g. tied down, confinement to small space) and bi pedal role models?  | I think that humans will naturally learn to crawl (or some version thereof) without the need for observation and that this mode of getting around is probably more deeply ingrained in the motor patterns than upright walking. So in answer to your question: There are certain movement patterns that are innate and some that are learned through observation and new motor patterns. Walking belongs in the latter category.(There are some reflexes in infants such as the stepping reflex that give the impression that the infant has the innate ability to walk but this reflex disappears as the infant ages.) 10-04-2014 5:17pm

Comment by Carrie Sasynuik

It's interesting, since mobility is key in all species for survival.  I suppose crawling would actually be a more "natural" instinct (evolutionarily speaking). It's true of all of our genes, the environment must be conducive to those... more »It's interesting, since mobility is key in all species for survival.  I suppose crawling would actually be a more "natural" instinct (evolutionarily speaking). It's true of all of our genes, the environment must be conducive to those genes expressing themselves and I had never actually thought of the observational component of this! 10-05-2014 6:06am

    Following This Shelf: