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    Biomechanics

Barefoot Running?

The Roving Runner strides along Central Park barefoot with Christopher McDougall, author of the best-selling book "Born to Run." To read more and to comment on this video go to the

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Hey Dr. Reiss, Barefoot running is the topic that I am most interested in when it comes to running. I am not a big runner by any means, but have always thought that we should run with shoes. Articles like this have opened my eyes as to how there... more »Hey Dr. Reiss, Barefoot running is the topic that I am most interested in when it comes to running. I am not a big runner by any means, but have always thought that we should run with shoes. Articles like this have opened my eyes as to how there are different ways to run and we may not always need running shoes. This article ties into our research on biomechanics, normally most people who run with shoes strike the ground with their heel first. When we run without shoes, we switch to a fore foot strike. This biomechanical change, changes the muscles that we use while running and effects which areas of our bodies take the brunt of impact! After researching this in class for a few weeks, I have decided to see if running without shoes could work for me. 10-26-2014 8:20pm

Comment by Steven Braun

When ever i exercise at the gym or go running i do it in flat shoes or barefoot. I do it because it feels more natural and comfortable. I always do this on leg day as it feels better when squatting or deadlifting 300-400 lbs 03-18-2015 11:23pm

Comment by Stanislav Bukhalau

I run barefoot because I have no arches.  When I run in sneakers, they have the arch support which hurts my feet.  Even if I take it out, I am still uncomfortable.  I do not believe I am sold on whether it is better... more »I run barefoot because I have no arches.  When I run in sneakers, they have the arch support which hurts my feet.  Even if I take it out, I am still uncomfortable.  I do not believe I am sold on whether it is better to run with shoes or barefoot.  I would say, if it causes you pain, you should do it.  This is the same recommendation we would give someone who is starting out exercising in general, why wouldn't it be the case for situations like this.  It seems researchers are trying to push one way or the other.  We should note that not everyone is the same so what may work for one, may not work for another. 03-19-2015 8:20pm

Comment by Robin Hill

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