Share This Item:
    Exercise Physiology

PLOS ONE: Adverse Metabolic Response to Regular Exercise: Is It a Rare or Common Occurrence?

Abstract Background Individuals differ in the response to regular exercise. Whether there are people who experience adverse changes in cardiovascular and diabetes risk factors has never been addressed. Methodology/Principal Findings An adverse response is defined as an exercise-induced change that worsens a risk factor beyond measurement error and expected day-to-day variation.

Comments

This was a rather interesting study.  Adverse metabolic reactions are not something that I would have normally considered with a client.  As with most studies I read though it simply leaves me with more questions than... more »This was a rather interesting study.  Adverse metabolic reactions are not something that I would have normally considered with a client.  As with most studies I read though it simply leaves me with more questions than answers.  There are simply too many variables to consider to draw concrete conclusions from this study.  I agree with the authors that there is probably a genetic adaptation or variable that is at the heart of these adverse reactions.  A question I have is whether the adaptation is environmental or a result of the sedentary lifestyle?  Also given a more protracted period of time or more intense training stimulus will the body adapt and self correct?  I understand not all things are able to be "fixed".  However, 8% is a rather large percentage of the population that has an adverse reaction to exercise.  This in my mind is not survivable as a species.   | One particular question I have concerning this is whether this is  a systemic inflammatory response to the increased exercise?  Seeing some of the common inflammatory markers and stress hormone values as related to the increased physical demands would be interesting.   | From a training perspective this study has made me more aware of some of the limitations some of my clients may experience that I need to be aware of.  Over the course of time when working with obese or sedentary individuals I may actually run into this problem, at near 10% it is almost guaranteed.  So until there is a better way to identify these types of risks I think this is some good information to keep in the back of my head when I am evaluating performance and potential of clients. 12-07-2012 6:06am

Thumb
Comment by Joe Lee

It is an interesting concept.  I think it is important to always remember that exercise is a stressor...the higher the intensity, longer duration, or even just the novelty of it makes it a stressor, and our body responds... more »It is an interesting concept.  I think it is important to always remember that exercise is a stressor...the higher the intensity, longer duration, or even just the novelty of it makes it a stressor, and our body responds accordingly.  Of course one way we respond to this is via inflammation, which is linked to numerous chronic diseases.  The inflammatory response is in some ways proportionate to the amount of damage done. Increase intensity and or duration too quickly, large inflammatory response.  | What makes it specific to the individual is: 1)Intensity is relative and 2) Genetic factors likely influence how we respond from an inflammatory perspective and 3)Dietary factors. | The principle of individuality...it never goes away and is something we should always take into consideration. 12-07-2012 7:07am

Tags:

    Following This Shelf: